Banana-Oat Pancakes

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Late last year, I had the chance to contribute to the Hipcamp Journal.

Hipcamp, for those of you who aren’t familiar, is a comprehensive search platform for campsites across the country. They aim to connect people with the outdoors, and “to inspire the next generation of people who are passionate about exploring AND protecting our lands.”  A mission I can definitely stand with, but an incredible resource as well.

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For their site, I came up with a recipe for pancakes that are easy to prepare outdoors. Since I do not eat any dairy, wheat, or soy – you won’t find any of these ingredients in the recipe either. The base, which frequently is the case for gluten-free (and paleo) pancakes, is bananas. Bananas are one of my miracle foods. I buy them every time I go to the grocery store – frequently for pancakes or banana bread, or to eat with almond butter, freeze & blend in smoothies, or for this Banoffee Pie from My New Roots. The other ingredients are simple but wholesome – gluten-free oats to give texture, and almond meal for flavor and sustenance.

To find the recipe & full post, go to Hipcamp’s Journal here.

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three favorite recipes // august 2014

Rice Noodle Salad with Nuoc Cham | Inspired by Epicurious

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If I could I would eat a variation of this every day. This salad has all of the same elements and flavors as my favorite lunch in San Francisco- spring rolls from Out the Door

Summer Peach Crisp | The Year In Food

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I have made this recipe over and over again since Kimberley’s cookbook was released earlier this summer. It’s so delicious (and gluten free)! I highly recommend picking up a copy of Vibrant Food.

Fresh Corn Soup | Inspired by David Lebovitz, Sprouted Kitchen & Food52

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 presetThe first corn soup that really caught my attention was this one from Sprouted Kitchen. I made it on a whim for a dinner party three years ago, and it’s the basis of this recipe that I have followed many times since. Whenever you cut corn off the cob (in the summertime), save the cobs in the refrigerator until you are ready to make stock. When you do, cover them with salted water in the pot and simmer for several hours. The drained stock that results will add an extra depth of flavor to the soup that is more than worth the minimal effort.

I few variations I recommend: adding more heat with some roasted poblanos, texture (like David Lebovitz’ recipe here), or serving the soup as a base with a variety of toppings – roasted veggies, salsa & avocado (like pictured above), or even pork shoulder.

oxford american, “this land is our land”

“For those of us who live to eat, there are hopeful times. Mindful eating is in vogue. As I write these words, Michael Pollan has two books on the New York Times bestseller list, and our first lady is focusing her attention on linkages between this nation’s food supply chain and childhood obesity. Perhaps a change is coming in what and how we eat. Soon, someone is going to realize that those white kids in their twenties, the ones who swear allegiance to the “good, clean, and fair” dictum that defines the Slow Food Movement, the ones who know how to decipher the recycling numbers on the bottoms of plastic bottles and actually buy carbon offsets when they fly–have a few things in common with the grizzled vets who fulminate on behalf of the Federation of Southern cooperatives. Both groups are determined. And righteous.”

-John T. Edge